Teaching

We teach the following courses at the mid to advanced undergraduate and graduate levels.

Graduate

GEOG/ANTH 569: Environment and Development (Jessica Barnes)
This course explores the intersections of international development and environmental change. Students will become familiar with theories of development, issues of environmental change and degradation, and how they come together in particular places through both conceptual and case-study readings.

GEOG/ANTH 581: Globalization and Cultural Questions (David Kneas)

GEOG 501: Political Geography (Meredith DeBoom)
This course investigates the relationship between geography and politics, including how power operates over space and the role of place in the uneven distribution of global power. Students will learn how to apply political geographic theories to a variety of pressing global issues, including nationalism, state-building, conflict, natural resource governance, climate change, and geopolitics.

ENVR 501: Global Food Politics (Jessica Barnes)
This course examines the political, social, and cultural landscapes of food and farming around the world. The course traces global food systems from production to consumption. We  start at the point of agricultural production, exploring current controversies over international land grabs and genetically modified seeds. We look at the global trade in food commodities and the inequalities embedded within the global food system. Finally we  examine food consumption and the links between consumption, class, and identity. 

GEOG 720: Producing and Consuming Nature and Natural Resources (David Kneas)

GEOG 730: Advanced Readings in Nature-Society (Jessica Barnes)
How do societies both shape and become shaped by their environments? This graduate seminar explores this question through the discussion of key themes in contemporary nature-society scholarship, including scale, materiality, knowledge, expertise, and infrastructure.

HIST/ENVR 700: Visions and Revisions of Nature (Tom Lekan)
This comparative and global special topics seminar attracts PhD and MA students in history, public history, geography, English, comparative literature, the Master of Arts in Teaching, and the MEERM degree program. The next iteration of the course will focus on urban environmental history and environmental justice.

HIST 700-level: Graduate Reading Seminar in Environmental History (Tom Lekan)

ENVR/AfAm: Race, Nature, Power (Monica Barra)
This course examines the ways ideas about nature and racial difference are conceptually and materially entwined with the production of social and environmental inequalities. Grounded in theoretical frameworks on settler colonialism, racial formations, and social justice, this course explores the ways racial inequalities are created and reinforced through the management and manipulation of the environment. In turn, the course examines the efforts of indigenous and minority groups to imagine alternative engagements with nature and the environment.

Undergraduate

GEOG 313: Economic Geography (Conor Harrison)
This course aims to examine where and how in time and place products are produced and consumed, and the political and social relations that are formed through their production and exchange.

GEOG 321: Sustainable Cities (Conor Harrison)
This course focuses on the city as the primary location of environmental, social, and economic sustainability efforts in both historical and contemporary contexts. The course draws on concepts and theories from urban studies, geography, sociology, and planning to examine the natural and social flows of resources, people, and money that have and continue to structure life in cities.

SCHC 337: Global Environmental Imagery (David Kneas)

GEOG 343: Human Impact on the Environment (Introduction to Political Ecology) (David Kneas)

GEOG 347: Water as a Resource (Jessica Barnes)
This course examines the political, social, and cultural dimensions of water resources management. In the first part of the class we explore the multiple functions that water fulfills as a resource. The second part of the class focuses on the political dynamics of water distribution, access, and use.

GEOG: Geography of Human Rights (Meredith DeBoom)
Human rights have become one of the most powerful — and controversial — ways through which societies pursue a more just world. This course introduces key theoretical approaches to human rights and analyzes the definition, development, and uneven implementation of those ideals across a variety of international contexts.

ENVR 352: Energy, Society, and Sustainability (Conor Harrison)
This course considers the role of energy in shaping the social, cultural, and political landscapes in which we live, as well as how energy is shaped by the societal values and norms when it is extracted, produced, and consumed. To do this we consider the wide variety of social, economic, physical, and cultural geographies that shape the ways and reasons we use energy.

HIST 360: Into the Wild: Global Conservation since 1800 (Tom Lekan)
A global and comparative environmental-historical investigation of the ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural significance of wilderness protection, nature conservation, national parks, and nature tourism. This course requires field excursions and experiential learning modules beyond the classroom.

HIST 378: The Urban Experience in Modern Europe (Tom Lekan)
This course explores the social, cultural, and environmental impact of urbanization in Europe since 1789 through case studies of London, Paris, Vienna, and Berlin. Each case study analyzes urban environments and urban metabolism, particularly the relationship between power and environmental knowledge in the making of the “sanitary city.”

HIST 350: Saving Africa: Humanitarianism and Development in Historical Perspective (Joshua Grace)

HIST 352: Africa Since 1800 – Theory from the South (Joshua Grace)

HIST 497/498 Senior Seminar for History Majors (Tom Lekan)
This capstone course for history majors invites students to apply the knowledge and skills they have gained in their undergraduate studies to the writing of a major historical research paper based on primary sources. I have offered two different versions of this course. One if called “Exploring Local Environmental History” and is a collaboration with the Green Quad Learning Center for Sustainable Futures and the public history program.

ENVR 590: Environmental Issues Seminar: Environmental History in Public Lands (Tom Lekan)
This capstone course for environmental science and environmental studies majors is defined as a “collaborative study of a contemporary issue.” My course assembles the students in team projects that assist public lands agencies with landscape interpretation, sustainability, and/or resource management issues: Congaree National Park, Sesquicentennial State Park, and Fort Jackson Military Base.

GEOG/ANTH 569: Environment and Development (Jessica Barnes)
This course explores the intersections of international development and environmental change. Students will become familiar with theories of development, issues of environmental change and degradation, and how they come together in particular places through both conceptual and case-study readings.

GEOG/ANTH 581: Globalization and Cultural Questions (David Kneas)

GEOG 501: Political Geography (Meredith DeBoom)
This course investigates the relationship between geography and politics, including how power operates over space and the role of place in the uneven distribution of global power. Students will learn how to apply political geographic theories to a variety of pressing global issues, including nationalism, state-building, conflict, natural resource governance, climate change, and geopolitics.

ENVR 501: Global Food Politics (Jessica Barnes)
This course examines the political, social, and cultural landscapes of food and farming around the world. The course traces global food systems from production to consumption. We  start at the point of agricultural production, exploring current controversies over international land grabs and genetically modified seeds. We look at the global trade in food commodities and the inequalities embedded within the global food system. Finally we  examine food consumption and the links between consumption, class, and identity. 

ENVR/AFAM: Environmental Justice (Monica Barra)
This course introduces students to the history of the environmental justice movement and its transformation in the North American and global context. Students will become familiar with key ideas, terms, and political struggles that define the contemporary environmental justice movement for diverse groups and the ways their political work is situated within the broader understandings of environmentalism.

ENVR/ANTH: Environmental Anthropology (Monica Barra)
Environmental anthropology encompasses the study of human-environment relationships with a particular focus on how environments and human culture are shaped by one another. This course spans early work in environmental anthropology to contemporary research that investigates environmental justice, resource extraction, and climate change from a global context.

 

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